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Crafter Of The Week: Jimmy Wanfelt

  • 3 min read

At Scorch Marker, we love our customers! And, we really enjoy seeing and sharing all the wonderful things they create. This week, we talked with crafter Jimmy Wanfelt to learn more about his experience with the Scorch Marker. Here's what he had to say.

What inspired you to start wood burning? Tell us about who or what influenced you, how you got started, and what inspired you.

I used to draw with soldering pens in school.

Of course it's really hard to do, but I saw a video on YouTube of someone making a dreamcatcher online and made it look easy.

So I thought hmm maybe I should give this a try again. So I bought a soldering pen and tried it out again.

It was like love at first sight. But it was slow.

So I bought a torch and mixed them together. As time went on, I did more and more work with the torch.

When I got my hands ona Scorch Marker, I was able to get a more matte effect and it brought my artwork to the next level.

I then naturally began to use the torch and Scorch Marker more and more for my artwork. 

What is your wood burning setup like? Tell us about the tools you use to create projects. Do you have any favorites?

I use a variety of torches, different sizes of flames for more or less control.

It's like having different brush sizes.

I use a lot of kitchenware like spatulas, spoons and utensils. Some of them I cut into round shapes so I can protect different areas of the wood.

Very similar to airbrushing cars, the techniques they use there.

I occasionally use white pens for highlights in the eyes.

I use grinding tools like a Dremel to grind away the surface and expose raw wood underneath. it also helps with the sharpness and lines in the image.

If you only work with a big flame, it's hard to get detail and sharpness.


What types of projects do you love to create & what type of projects are you currently working on?

I really enjoy animals.

Big cats, old men, the human form.

I like to capture emotion and tend to experiment with techniques that push my comfort zone so I can get better.

What is your creation process? Is there a process?

I show up as my best self. It goes quite easy and naturally if you respect yourself and your customers' time.

Do the best work you can with the given time.

There isn't really a process for me, but I need to be in the right frame of mind.

When I am driven I work hard 16 hour days but I need to be in that state of mind. I don't know when the next phase will come.

Sometimes I do it for a need or an order, and sometimes it just feels right to do the work.

What project are you the most proud of? What did you find challenging or unique about it?

I can't pick just one. I love the whole range of things that I create.

In the beginning, I really struggled with setting prices because I made it!

But now that I have sold many things and created hundreds of items, it's been easier to detach myself and run it more like a business.

You become really humble when you work a long time at a craft. The ego disintegrates over time when pride diminishes, then it becomes more about what I can do for the other person.

That shift has really humbled me. I like making people feel good, that's why I do the work.

Where can people check out more of your projects? Website URL, social profiles, etc

Instagram @pyroexpressions

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